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EMS Are Double Finalists in the HW Chamber Business Awards 2019




EMS are excited to announce that we are finalists in the Herefordshire and Worcestershire Chamber of Commerce Business Awards! This year is the seventeenth annual Chamber Business Awards.

We are finalists in two of the fourteen categories; Excellence in Professional Services sponsored by Worcestershire County Council and Excellence in Customer Service sponsored by Handelsbanken.

There were over 130 entries for this years awards. EMS are very proud of our whole team and look forward to the Awards Ceremony held in July at the Worcester Arena.All winners on the night will also be entered into the Business of the Year Award, sponsored by Folk2Folk.

Legionella Risk Assessments for Charity Organisation- North Wales
2018
legionella risk assessment north wales


EMS Water recently completed a Legionella risk assessment on behalf of a charity organisation in North Wales. The charity occupy part of the building but retain landlord responsibility for their tenants who occupy other floors of the building.

The building and water services within this listed building had been refurbished in 2012 and the underlying belief of the organisation was that there was no need for management of their water systems in relation to Legionella due to it being modern. This is a common misconception; the age of a water system has no legal baring on what organisations or individuals in control of the premises must do to ensure safe management.
The first area of the water system observed was the incoming town mains supply, this was seen to feed two boosted cold-water storage tanks which in turn served all of the cold water around the building. This included drinking water. Although not a legionella risk, water systems set up in this way are required to be managed to retain the wholesomeness of the water within the system. If drinking water is to be served from a tank it must be designed and managed so that it will maintain the water quality category set out under the water regulations.
Although the tanks were clean and suitably constructed for this purpose the owner had not been informed of the requirement for such tanks supplying drinking water in a building. This is with the exception of a domestic dwelling in accordance with BS8558:2015.
Next on the agenda was the centralised hot water system. This was a very efficient rinnai gas fired unvented water heater with recirculation. The system was able to deliver hot water throughout all floors within a quick time frame while retaining minimal water. When observations were taken of the outlets it served we noticed a large number of thermostatic mixing valves were installed into the system. As this building was serving tenants and people not within the control of the client this was a wise choice in preventing harm or injury by scald. However, the majority of thermostatic mixing valves (TMV’s for short) were seen to be providing hot water above the recommended outlet temperature, thus still presenting a risk of scald to users. It was highlighted to the client that this device is a mechanical safety device and should be safe for use IF maintained in a safe condition and inspected to ensure it is correctly installed and does not subsequently deteriorate. Within a short time frame,the client had addressed this issue by adjusting the valves to a more suitable temperature. This remedial solution was cost effective it was something they were able to do themselves through one of their competent staff.

Overall,the system itself was determined to be in a good clean condition and therefore posed a low risk in relation to Legionella due to the storage and distribution of both hot and cold water within the premises and the activities that this water is used for. However, the client was able to ensure that their overall compliance with British standards, the Approved Code of Practice L8 and regulations such as COSHH, the Management of Health and Safety Regulations 1999 and PUWER1998 was ensured.

BS8580

Water Quality. Risk Assessments for Legionella control. Code of Practice

This standard gives recommendations and guidance on the assessment of the risk of legionellosis presented by artificial water systems. It is applicable to any undertaking involving a work activity or premises controlled in connection with a trade, business or other undertaking where water is used or stored in circumstances that could cause a reasonably foreseeable risk of exposure to legionellae and contracting legionellosis.

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Legionnaires’ disease

Sometimes referred to as hybrid or adiabatic coolersIn recent years there has been increasing use of dry/wet cooling systems which are described in HSG274 Legionella Technical Guidance Part 1, paragraphs 1.18-1.21. These are designed to operate both in dry air cooled mode and wet evaporative cooling mode. There are different types of dry/wet cooling systems, sometimes referred to as “hybrid” or “adiabatic” coolers, and these can have a wide range of risk profiles.

The Water Management Society, endorsed by HSE, has published a document which supplements HSG274 Part 1 with more detailed information to help evaluate between different designs and risk profiles of dry/wet cooling equipment. This guidance is to help dutyholders, which includes employers, those in control of premises and those with health and safety responsibilities for others, to comply with their legal duties and gives practical guidance on how to assess and control the risks due to legionella bacteria in dry/wet cooling systems.

HSG 282

Control of Legionella and Other Infectious Agents in Spa Pool Systems

Spa-pool systems are increasingly popular and can be found in a variety of sizes and settings. They are known by various names including hot spas, hot tubs, whirlpool spas and portable spas. Such systems pose a reasonably foreseeable risk as they are a recognised source of diseases caused by infectious agents including the organism that causes legionnaires’ disease, primarily Legionella pneumophila. There have been a number of outbreaks linked to spa-pool systems in leisure centres, hotels, holiday homes, on cruise ships and on display.

HSE’s guide The control of legionella and other infectious agents in spa-pool system, produced in consultation with Public Health England, and local authority and industry representatives, will help managers and operators assess and control the risk of exposure. It will also help service suppliers, designers, manufacturers, importers, suppliers and installers comply with their legal duties and keep spa-pool systems free of legionella.

As well as advice on operating and maintaining commercial-type systems, the guide provides specific advice on domestic-type spa pools or hot tubs used as part of a business activity, eg in holiday-park rental units, hotel bedrooms with a dedicated spa and systems on display or at exhibitions.

Cooling tower pack

Removal of the cooling tower pack, where this can be done relatively easily and reinstated safely without damage, will inform the inspection and assessment and aid any potential cleaning but the construction of the tower and the practicability of the pack removal should be considered when reaching a decision on the means by which the water system is to be maintained in a clean state.   However, whether the pack is removed or not, evidence of its cleanliness should be demonstrated, an assessment made using appropriate techniques and the findings recorded.

Legionnaires’ disease

Approved Code of Practice L8

Legionnaires’ disease is a severe form of pneumonia caused by legionella bacteria. You don’t catch it from other people, but by breathing in tiny droplets of contaminated water. Legionella bacteria also cause a milder illness called Pontiac fever.
This Approved Code of Practice (ACOP) gives advice on the requirements of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974 (the HSW Act)1 and the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 (COSHH)2 and applies to the risk from exposure to legionella bacteria (the causative agent of legionellosis, including Legionnaires’ disease). In particular it gives guidance on sections 2, 3, 4 and 6 of the HSW Act and regulations 6, 7, 8, 9 and 12 of COSHH. The Code also gives guidance on compliance with the relevant parts of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 (the Management Regulations).3
This fourth edition of the ACOP and guidance on regulations contains revisions to simplify and clarify the text giving the following issues ACOP status:

Risk assessment
The specific role of an appointed competent person, known as the ‘responsible person’
The control scheme
Review of control measures
Duties and responsibilities of those involved in the supply of water systems


In addition to the Approved Code of Practice, the HSE have produced a technical guidance for dutyholders, which includes employers, those in control of premises and those with health and safety responsibilities for others, to help them comply with their legal duties.

The guidance gives practical advice on the legal requirements of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 concerning the risk from exposure to legionella and guidance on compliance with the relevant parts of the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999.

The guidance is in three parts:
Part 1: The control of legionella bacteria in evaporative cooling systems
Part 2: The control of legionella bacteria in hot and cold water systems
Part 3: The control of legionella bacteria in other risk systems

Case Study - Legionella Risk Assessments for Churches - South London 2018
water storage tanks



As part of a program of works for a faith led organisation, we undertook Legionella risk assessments at all of their sites throughout the UK. The buildings each had similar use and were believed to be low risk. The client had been informed of the need to ‘test’ for Legionella and as a result had been undertaking water samples for the last few years. Upon our consultancy it was highlighted to the client that this action alone would not enable them to be compliant with the requirements set out by legislation such the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, COSHH, the Management of Health and Safety Regulations 1999 and that sampling should only have to be undertaken where deemed necessary based upon the water systems and circumstances at each site.

The client ceased the water sampling program they were carrying out as it was deemed unnecessary for the perceived risk of the buildings. The majority of the client’s property stock were indeed low risk premises and we were able to advise of a small number of actions they needed to complete to comply with legislation.  The majority of these were to do with management systems they needed to evidence.However, one site differed, and it was found that the building purpose built for its current use within the last 30 years, had a water system that was designed in such a way that the large volumes of water remained stagnant within the system and this stagnation was evident within the system from both the temperature of the distributed water and the internal condition of 2/3 of the tanks present.

Although the client had been taking samples at their sites,the lack of understanding of their water systems due having no documented asset register, schematics or previous survey had meant that they had only sampled the kitchen cold outlet. This was due to the belief that all water outlets were fed from the same system. Subsequently, the poor distribution and water condition of the cold water system had therefore gone unnoticed for some time.Upon receipt of the Legionella risk assessment the client quickly sought advice on the best way to remedy this issue.

We were able to offer a number of practical L8 compliant solutions to address this. It was deemed that bypassing the poorly designed tanks and placing the water services onto the town mains supply would be the most effective solution for cost in the immediate and long term. This also suited the organisation due to the lack of trained members able to inspect such water assets. This solution also significantly reduced the risk of this issue occurring again due to the elimination of the risk, which is the first step of COSHH 2002. EMS Water were able to source a competent contractor to undertake the work on their behalf for a reasonable cost from our industry knowledge. The risk assessment deemed the need to sample their water as they had doing for the last four years unnecessary. This meant that the client would quickly recoup the finances spent on the Legionella risk assessment by eliminating the forecasted spend they had planned over the next two years. The client is now confident in the knowledge that they are on the right track for compliance with legislation. They have an Approved Code of Practice L8 compliant regime which requires little effort for them based upon the low risk water systems they now have. They are also able to understand what systems and assets they have and what they serve, and most importantly,  they have evidenced the level of risk posed and that they have done what is ‘reasonably practicable’ to minimise the risks present.

Our aftercare has supported the client in setting up a small amount of management systems for their operations throughout the UK for consistency amongst all sites. Any water system that has the right environmental conditions can potentially be a source for legionella bacteria growth. However, the management of your water systems and Legionella has no need to be have complex and a few simple precautions can ensure that you are minimising the risks from your water systems and activities. It is however, pivotal to understand the systems that are in place in order to manage them correctly. It must also be noted that just because we perceive it to be low risk, it doesn’t mean that it always is. The precautions that are put in place must be specific to the system and activities

Legionnaires’ disease

Sometimes referred to as hybrid or adiabatic coolersIn recent years there has been increasing use of dry/wet cooling systems which are described in HSG274 Legionella Technical Guidance Part 1, paragraphs 1.18-1.21. These are designed to operate both in dry air cooled mode and wet evaporative cooling mode. There are different types of dry/wet cooling systems, sometimes referred to as “hybrid” or “adiabatic” coolers, and these can have a wide range of risk profiles.

The Water Management Society, endorsed by HSE, has published a document which supplements HSG274 Part 1 with more detailed information to help evaluate between different designs and risk profiles of dry/wet cooling equipment. This guidance is to help dutyholders, which includes employers, those in control of premises and those with health and safety responsibilities for others, to comply with their legal duties and gives practical guidance on how to assess and control the risks due to legionella bacteria in dry/wet cooling systems.

HSG 282

Control of Legionella and Other Infectious Agents in Spa Pool Systems

Spa-pool systems are increasingly popular and can be found in a variety of sizes and settings. They are known by various names including hot spas, hot tubs, whirlpool spas and portable spas. Such systems pose a reasonably foreseeable risk as they are a recognised source of diseases caused by infectious agents including the organism that causes legionnaires’ disease, primarily Legionella pneumophila. There have been a number of outbreaks linked to spa-pool systems in leisure centres, hotels, holiday homes, on cruise ships and on display.

HSE’s guide The control of legionella and other infectious agents in spa-pool system, produced in consultation with Public Health England, and local authority and industry representatives, will help managers and operators assess and control the risk of exposure. It will also help service suppliers, designers, manufacturers, importers, suppliers and installers comply with their legal duties and keep spa-pool systems free of legionella.

As well as advice on operating and maintaining commercial-type systems, the guide provides specific advice on domestic-type spa pools or hot tubs used as part of a business activity, eg in holiday-park rental units, hotel bedrooms with a dedicated spa and systems on display or at exhibitions.

Cooling tower pack

Removal of the cooling tower pack, where this can be done relatively easily and reinstated safely without damage, will inform the inspection and assessment and aid any potential cleaning but the construction of the tower and the practicability of the pack removal should be considered when reaching a decision on the means by which the water system is to be maintained in a clean state.   However, whether the pack is removed or not, evidence of its cleanliness should be demonstrated, an assessment made using appropriate techniques and the findings recorded.

BS8558:2015

Guide to the design, installation, testing and maintenance of services supplying water for domestic use within buildings and their curtilages. Complementary guidance to BS EN 806

BS 8558:2015 was developed to provide complementary guidance to the BS EN 806 suite of standards. Together, these documents provide best practice for the design, installation, alteration, testing, operation and maintenance of hot and cold water services for domestic use in buildings.

This standard is for anyone involved in the design, installation, testing, operation and maintenance of services, including water companies, product manufacturers and installers of water supply services in the UK.

This standard provides UK guidelines for the water supply services industry on all aspects of sampling and monitoring of hot and cold water services. It also gives guidance on underground pipework within the curtilage of a building.

Since the revision in 2015, the standard now provides more coverage of the control of Legionella, with references to PD 855468:2015 and to the HSE’s ACoP L8 and HSG274 Part 2. In addition, recommendations for flushing and disinfection have been revised to link more closely with the revised HSE ACoP L8 and HSG274 Part 2.

Legionnaires’ disease

Sometimes referred to as hybrid or adiabatic coolersIn recent years there has been increasing use of dry/wet cooling systems which are described in HSG274 Legionella Technical Guidance Part 1, paragraphs 1.18-1.21. These are designed to operate both in dry air cooled mode and wet evaporative cooling mode. There are different types of dry/wet cooling systems, sometimes referred to as “hybrid” or “adiabatic” coolers, and these can have a wide range of risk profiles.

The Water Management Society, endorsed by HSE, has published a document which supplements HSG274 Part 1 with more detailed information to help evaluate between different designs and risk profiles of dry/wet cooling equipment. This guidance is to help dutyholders, which includes employers, those in control of premises and those with health and safety responsibilities for others, to comply with their legal duties and gives practical guidance on how to assess and control the risks due to legionella bacteria in dry/wet cooling systems.

Cooling tower pack

Removal of the cooling tower pack, where this can be done relatively easily and reinstated safely without damage, will inform the inspection and assessment and aid any potential cleaning but the construction of the tower and the practicability of the pack removal should be considered when reaching a decision on the means by which the water system is to be maintained in a clean state.   However, whether the pack is removed or not, evidence of its cleanliness should be demonstrated, an assessment made using appropriate techniques and the findings recorded.

Legionnaires’ disease

Sometimes referred to as hybrid or adiabatic coolersIn recent years there has been increasing use of dry/wet cooling systems which are described in HSG274 Legionella Technical Guidance Part 1, paragraphs 1.18-1.21. These are designed to operate both in dry air cooled mode and wet evaporative cooling mode. There are different types of dry/wet cooling systems, sometimes referred to as “hybrid” or “adiabatic” coolers, and these can have a wide range of risk profiles.

The Water Management Society, endorsed by HSE, has published a document which supplements HSG274 Part 1 with more detailed information to help evaluate between different designs and risk profiles of dry/wet cooling equipment. This guidance is to help dutyholders, which includes employers, those in control of premises and those with health and safety responsibilities for others, to comply with their legal duties and gives practical guidance on how to assess and control the risks due to legionella bacteria in dry/wet cooling systems.

Cooling tower pack

Removal of the cooling tower pack, where this can be done relatively easily and reinstated safely without damage, will inform the inspection and assessment and aid any potential cleaning but the construction of the tower and the practicability of the pack removal should be considered when reaching a decision on the means by which the water system is to be maintained in a clean state.   However, whether the pack is removed or not, evidence of its cleanliness should be demonstrated, an assessment made using appropriate techniques and the findings recorded.

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EMS Water Swimming Pool Picture
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